Archive for the 'movie review' Category

In so many countries and societies around the world, social unrest is flowing out from homes social media into the streets. In this episode, Dr Noga Ariel Galor joins Gil Kidron to break down the psychoanalytical perspective of this very tense moment in history, through a wide array of movies depicting fictional and real civil unrests and revolts.

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We launch a new series of episodes titled The Downfall of the U.S. in Movies to draw a line from American history - and more importantly, their depiction of American history - to the political, social, and economic crisis it is living through now. The first episode is about America's creation story - its War of Independence. Its so-called Revolutionary War. The movie we chose for that momentous occasion is The Patriot (2000), starring Mel Gibson, encapsulating all that is wrong in the way Americans think of their beginnings.

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To prepare for the upcoming presidential elections in the United States, we tackle movies that depict elections, from the 1970s all the way to this past decade. What can we learn about the way the Americans hold this process? About the lead characters? In this episode, Rutger and Gil start with the most recent movie, and then move back in time: The Ides of March (2011), The Manchurian Candidate (2004), Primary Colors (1998), Bulworth (1998), Wag The Dog (1997) and Being There (1979).

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With the elections in the United States coming up this November, we map out five different archetypes of fictional TV and movie presidents (Frank Underwood, Jed Bartlet, Charles Lindberg, the president from Independence Day and Dave), and what they tell us about how America sees itself through its president, what it wants to imagine about itself and what kind of image it wants to send to the world. Writer and editor Omri Harel joins Gil Kidron to look at it all from an outsider's perspective.

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Imperial China has survived from antiquity all the way to the beginning of the 20th century - an unequalled historical feat. How do Chinese filmmakers view that? Are there differences between directors from Hong Kong, from Taiwan, and from the mainland? What does Hollywood do with it? Rutger and Gil glide through 2000 years of rich history through a Pod Academy record of 9 movies: Hero (2002), Red Cliff (2008), Dragon Blade (2015), Mulan (animated, 1998), The Great Wall (2015), Mulan (live-action, 2020), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2001) and The Last Emperor (1987).

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The tension between the big city and the bucolic village has existed since settled societies were formed. In this episode, we explore the depiction of the European countryside in movies: the clichés, imaginations, and twists. PhD candidate Anke Bosma joins Rutger and Gil to share about her research, which covers that topic and was turned into the idea for this episode by Anke. We rely on the movies Hot Fuzz (2007), Welcome to the Sticks (2013), Under the Tuscan Sun (2003), and A Man Called Ove (2015).

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Compared to movies about male-female romantic relationships and movies about female friendships, there's a dearth of movies about male friendships. We highlighted three of those movies to explore what they teach us about male relationships throughout life, from childhood friends (Good Will Hunting, 1997), through their early 30s (I Love You, Man, 2009) and then into full-blown adulthood (The Nice Guys, 2015). Therapist Noga Ariel Galor joins Gil Kidron again to break it all down.

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In our second instalment of Revolutions in Movies, we look at two of the most earth-shattering societal overturns history has ever seen, the Russian Revolution and the Chinese Communist Revolution. We analyze the Russian Revolution via the classic Doctor Zhivago (1965), and the turmoil in China that led the nation from imperial rule to Maoism via The Last Emperor (1987). Joining Gil and Rutger yet again are Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine Caccipuoti from the wonderful history podcast Footnoting History. Check them out at footnotinghistory.com

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Revolutions are some of history's most dramatic events and have entered our collective psyche, and mostly - the story each collective is trying to tell about itself. These stories are also told through movies, and in this first instalment of Revolutions in Movies we are going to focus on the American Revolution (via The Patriot, 2000) and the French Revolution (via Les Miserables, 2012, which depicts a failed revolution that came after the original one). Gil and Rutger are happy to have on the show the two wonderfully smart and engaging Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine Caccipuoti from the wonderful history podcast Footnoting History. Check them out here footnotinghistory.com

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What do we know about schizophrenia? What do we know about the lived experience of those who suffer from it? Should we treat them as sick weak people, or as people with their own abilities and ways of viewing the world? We have a very special guest on this episode, David Israel Cohen, a schizophrenic who break down with Gil Kidron the movie A Beautiful Mind (2001) with Russel Crowe, depicting the life of schizophrenic math legend, Nobel Laureate John Nash, the Father of Game Theory.

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